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James Kerr dobro lesson on YouTube

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Sep 18, 2020 - 5:39:19 PM

Pablo

USA

8 posts since 9/17/2008

People who like using on-line resources should know about a new option.

James Kerr is a terrific resophonic player and very knowledgeable about music. His work came up in Gunny's 2016 thread about how to approach figuring out a dobro part for Richard Thompson’s “Dimming of the Day.” This player is all over everything on the dobro: Josh Swift, J.S. Bach, Charlie Parker, Aretha Franklin, Fred McDowell, bluegrass standards, plus great original compositions. Check out his 2018 moment alone onstage with Jerry Douglas, harmonizing the lines on “Ankara to Izmir.”

James is starting to put up some instructional material on his YouTube channel. His introductory lesson looks at the great Herschel Sizemore instrumental “Rebecca.”

He talks a little bit about his teaching and breaks down his arrangement of “Rebecca.” There’s a page of tab included FREE if you subscribe to his channel. Probably more good things to come.

James approaches “Rebecca” down near the nut first, with plenty of hammer-ons and pull-offs, Then he goes through it again using melodic-style playing.

If you’re on the flight-deck ready for take-off and you haven’t explored melodic-style playing this is a huge opportunity to look at it with a good teacher leading the way.

Check out James Kerr’s YouTube channel. And don’t miss his super-tasteful instrumental “Jeannette” recorded in the nave of a church in Connecticut.

 

Sep 22, 2020 - 12:39:53 PM

1214 posts since 1/14/2011

quote:
Originally posted by Pablo

James approaches “Rebecca” down near the nut first, with plenty of hammer-ons and pull-offs, Then he goes through it again using melodic-style playing.


Nice playing, but what I find perplexing is why he's even teaching it slowly without the capo installed. I find that tunes capoed up so high feel differently on both hands to play around the (moved) nut and string tensions feel different when capoed.

Sep 22, 2020 - 5:54:51 PM

Pablo

USA

8 posts since 9/17/2008

Agree it's always better to work with the capo in place, right from the beginning. "Rebecca" in B and "New Camptown Races" in Bb

Sep 23, 2020 - 3:11:28 AM

170 posts since 7/9/2010

Hello,

Having observed JD using a capo, I understand why playing without one is important. Every capo takes time to place and apply.

The Beard Wave has one sweet spot. Anything left or right produces possible string slippage.

Charlie’s Capo is easier to apply than the Beard Wave. It is massively large compared to the Beard.

Both have their storage cases and sit in the instrument compartment of the case. JD wore a dress shirt with a pocket. The Wave is less intrusive than Charlie’s. Both are uncomfortable bouncing around on your chest.

The higher the bar is used, the less bass registers that are available. I did see multiple instruments on the stage for optimal tunings.

Sep 25, 2020 - 8:57:32 PM

1214 posts since 1/14/2011

quote:
Originally posted by AradoReso

The higher the bar is used, the less bass registers that are available. I did see multiple instruments on the stage for optimal tunings.


That depends on your guitar. My Beard E model works well capoed up to the 10th fret with full acoustic sound.

Sep 26, 2020 - 8:17:27 AM

170 posts since 7/9/2010

Hello,

I did not say capos don’t work. JH, MD, and JD say the same thing. The higher up the loss of lower sounds become acute. The shorter the string the higher the pitch.

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