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Please be with me Eric Clapton 461 Ocean Blvd

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Sep 24, 2020 - 12:22:48 PM
27 posts since 7/6/2020

I have looked everywhere for the dobro part of this song without any luck. It is simple and I assume it is in open D. if someone knows this I would greatly appreciate any help. Just a start would be of great help.

Anthony

Sep 24, 2020 - 2:36:58 PM

35 posts since 9/17/2013

E R-9-R b7 5 R-9-R b7 4
if you don't understand this shoot back

Sep 25, 2020 - 8:53:53 PM

1214 posts since 1/14/2011

quote:
Originally posted by bluetele

I have looked everywhere for the dobro part of this song without any luck. It is simple and I assume it is in open D.


Bad assumption. Sounds like standard tuning. The dobro part is just an accompaniment, so no reason to expect that it is tabbed anywhere. Anybody know who the player is? It's not particularly profound...

quote:
Originally posted by mmuussiiccaall

E R-9-R b7 5 R-9-R b7 4
if you don't understand this shoot back


this is gibberish to me....please explain.

Edited by - Oboe Cadobro on 09/25/2020 20:54:52

Sep 25, 2020 - 10:06:18 PM

27 posts since 7/6/2020

Thanks for your effort.

Sep 25, 2020 - 10:35:26 PM

3331 posts since 7/27/2008

I don't really understand Rick's shorthand either, though I tried to guess at it. 

The rhythm guitar in the song is indeed in standard tuning. 

I also think the (bottleneck) dobro was tuned to Open D. Clapton was the player. 

I was fooling around with it earlier today lap style in Open D and it seems pretty simple.

I have always liked the album, though Clapton naysayers will tell you that it was kind of weak, because they believe the last great thing he did was "Layla and Other Assorted Love Songs" three years prior. 

Edited by - MarkinSonoma on 09/25/2020 22:39:35

Sep 26, 2020 - 8:48:31 PM

35 posts since 9/17/2013

here's an explanation of my post


Sep 28, 2020 - 8:15:31 AM

8 posts since 7/2/2019

I’m surprised no one has yet mentioned this. Clapton was nearly certainly inspired by the (I think original) version by Cowboy because of a shared connection to Duane Allman, who features on Cowboy’s version. Everyone knows Duane favored Open D. I have tinkered around with Duane’s licks. Not ashamed to admit I cannot be sure what tuning he used. But I sure like playing it in Open G because Cowboy did his in key of D, with a big fat B minor which is just tons of fun to play in Open G

Sep 28, 2020 - 12:00:56 PM

1214 posts since 1/14/2011

quote:
Originally posted by MT

Clapton was nearly certainly inspired by the (I think original) version by Cowboy 


Who is Cowboy?

quote:
Originally posted by mmuussiiccaall

here's an explanation of my post


I read the attachment. I know standard notation, tablature, Nashville numbering, solfege, Gregorian chant, figured bass, and reverse Polish notation, but still can't figure out what your sequence means...blush

Sep 28, 2020 - 12:27:10 PM

8 posts since 7/2/2019

Cowboy has a Wiki page if you disambiguate the word, Cowboy

They were a band in the late 60s / 70s

I believe theirs was the first version of Please Be With Me. I imagine the songwriting credit goes to one or more of them

My guess is because they were label-mates with the Allman Brothers (Capricorn records), and because Duane never really stopped doing session work, the suits put Duane in the studio with Cowboy to see what would happen. Lo, and behold, we were forever blessed with Please Be with Me. Which may well have the only known recording of Duane using Open G. Seems like a missed opportunity to play a song in key of D that has a B minor chord and not go to Open G. But who knows. Very possible Duane stuck with Open D. Still noteworthy though since (I think) he’s using a square neck guitar

And Clapton, being such an admirer of Duane’s, knew of his “deep cuts” like Cowboy’s Please Be With Me

I still favor Cowboy’s over Clapton’s version. But that’s academic

Forgive me. I was an ABB scholar in college. Including buying Duane Allman’s Anthologies I and II. Tons of great music on those two collections. Other than that Cowboy track (on volume I), songs by Aretha, Boz Skaggs, King Curtis, Delaney & Bonnie, Wilson Pickett, the list goes on. Including Duane taking lead vocals on the Chuck Berry classic, No Money Down

Sorry for all the non-spider-bridge-reso content everyone

Sep 28, 2020 - 12:58:39 PM

3331 posts since 7/27/2008

I knew as soon as I read MT's post that more information was needed. smiley

Cowboy was a "Southern Rock"  band (I'm sure they hated that moniker as much as the Allman Brothers did) formed by Scott Boyer and Tommy Talton in the early '70s. They were on the same label as the Allmans (Capricorn). 

They were part of the backing band when I saw the Gregg Allman tour in 1974 in the Bay Area after he released his first and IMO still his best solo album, Laid Back. Talton in particular - fantastic guitar player. 

Another sidebar: they opened for the Allman Brothers in Oct. 1971 at Winterland in San Francisco, shortly before Duane Allman's death from a motorcycle accident. Huge mistake on my part - don't remember the reason but I didn't attend.  I was a senior in high school and a couple buddies were going to the show and asked me if I wanted to join them.  That would have been my only shot at seeing Duane Allman play in concert. 

"Everyone knows Duane favored Open D."

Not sure where you got your information  MT, and I don't claim to be the consummate Duane Allman historian,  but it's been my understanding that Duane played the vast majority of the time in Open E. Same interval as Open D (151351) but a whole step lower, so it's easy enough to adapt. 

Here is the original studio recording by Cowboy wth Duane on bottleneck - might be a  Dobro  spider bridge roundneck). but on second though it could be a National biscuit bridge that he owned. But people usally say "Dobro" in refernce to the song so I'm not sure.  

Edited by - MarkinSonoma on 09/28/2020 13:09:34

Sep 28, 2020 - 1:05:11 PM

3331 posts since 7/27/2008

I just entered my post above and lo and behold MT entered his latest around the same time, so I'm not going to go back and edit mine. 

Edited by - MarkinSonoma on 09/28/2020 13:06:12

Sep 28, 2020 - 1:08:43 PM

8 posts since 7/2/2019

The man is right; Duane tuned to Open E

I shouldn’t make the assumption that everyone else also thinks of Open E and D as basically the same That’s how I think about it

Anyone know what exactly the tuning is that Bonnie Raitt uses? I have heard on good authority she plays in Open A... Think that’s like Open G but up two half steps?

Or is it like an actually open A chord on regular guitar (6 to 1): E / A / E / A / C# / E

Which would be V / I / V / I / III / V. That would be interesting

Maybe this needs its own thread. And it’s not about reso again. Sorry

Sep 28, 2020 - 1:12:03 PM

3331 posts since 7/27/2008

No need to apologize for it not being about "reso" since the forum has served both styles of playing pretty much since the beginning, but lap stye is usually the dominant subject matter. 

Though if I thought of Open E and Open D as the same thing, I would hate to start a song in the wrong key while playing in front of an audience. Been there - done that. wink 

Edited by - MarkinSonoma on 09/28/2020 13:18:50

Sep 28, 2020 - 1:15:59 PM

3331 posts since 7/27/2008

And for anyone not familiar with it, here is Clapton's version. 


 

Sep 28, 2020 - 1:54:03 PM

989 posts since 2/2/2011

quote:
Originally posted by MT


Anyone know what exactly the tuning is that Bonnie Raitt uses? I have heard on good authority she plays in Open A... Think that’s like Open G but up two half steps?

Or is it like an actually open A chord on regular guitar (6 to 1): E / A / E / A / C# / E

Which would be V / I / V / I / III / V. That would be interesting

Maybe this needs its own thread. And it’s not about reso again. Sorry


(personal aside: I last saw Raitt one year ago this week at Madison Square Garden opening for Mark Knopfler.  Whole lotta slidin' going on!  And many resonators were heard as well. Great concert.)

She plays the strat in open A.  That is E-A-E-A-C#-A low to high,  just like Lowell George (as best I can determine).  With a fair bit of compression to level things out and help the sustain. She sounds like an angel (from montgomery?).

Yeah, and don't be concerned asking about the roundneck style around here.  A lot of us play both round and square neck guitars.

Sep 28, 2020 - 2:27:34 PM

35 posts since 9/17/2013

here's a tab


Sep 30, 2020 - 9:28:35 AM

thebowl

USA

19 posts since 5/31/2016

Lots of good info here. Cowboy was Scott Boyer and Tommy Talton. They were in the "folk rock" branch of "Southern rock". I have two of their records, the eponymous and a second one, the title of which I can't recall here at work. And the two Duane Allman Anthologys are a treasure trove of bottleneck work, some of it iconic; some of it largely unknown to the general public. But guitar players know.

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