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Resonator Guitar Lovers Online


Jul 23, 2021 - 11:52:22 AM
85 posts since 3/30/2014

IV been playing on a 1979 omi dobro 60D. I going to get a new cone for it since the cone in it appears to be the original cone. I think I'm going to get a beard. Anybody know what size to get before I pull it apart or any tips to help.


 

Jul 23, 2021 - 12:45:31 PM
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121 posts since 11/9/2018

I own a '76 OMI. Without alterations, you will need a 10 1/2" cone. Many "modern" cones (beard included) are 10 9/16" diameter. Either the cone has to be trimmed (scary to me) or the opening has to be enlarged with a router or other tool (scary to me).

Jul 23, 2021 - 1:11:11 PM
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Tom Jr.

USA

543 posts since 7/28/2008

Trimming a cone is a very simple operation with a pair of scissors. It does not have to be absolutely perfect, just enough to fit in the existing hole.

Jul 23, 2021 - 9:45:37 PM

1126 posts since 9/29/2009

John Quarterman makes a 10 1/2 inch cone designed to fit old Dobros without trimming, available from Blue Note Woodworks but out of stock at the moment.

https://bluenotewoodworks.ecwid.com/Quarterman-QD-1-10-Res-O-Cone-10-1-2-p84148829

Also available is Replogle's cone designed to fit old Dobros without trimming. Be sure to order the "standard 10 1/2 ".

https://www.replogleresos.com/product/replogle-resonators-spider-cone-standard-10-1-2-series/

Jul 23, 2021 - 11:52:55 PM

Dobro60

USA

85 posts since 3/30/2014

So trim a 1/32 off the edge completely around. That's a thin cut off.

Jul 24, 2021 - 6:06:02 AM
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3663 posts since 7/27/2008

One thing about the Beard Legend cone is that the spider legs sit higher on the edge of the cone than other brands. This slightly raises the height of the bridge insert and can make for a tight fit under the palm rest - I have first hand experience.

Might not be a factor on a '70s OMI   but then again it might.

Rather than going through the cone trimming and making sure there is adequate clearance under the palm rest - for my money I would go for the 10 1/2" Replogle as an easy drop-in and be done with it. 

 

 
 

Jul 24, 2021 - 9:44:14 AM
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2BUCKS

USA

262 posts since 4/27/2015

quote:
Originally posted by Dobro60

So trim a 1/32 off the edge completely around. That's a thin cut off.


I agree, and the cone will never sit flush on the soundwell again if you trim it with scissors. Just buy a good quality 10 1/2" cone. 

Edited by - 2BUCKS on 07/24/2021 09:55:36

Jul 24, 2021 - 6:20:04 PM
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172 posts since 10/7/2008

Repogle cone, or the more expensive Beard legend for my1972 (so, OMI?) Model 60 Dobro? MIne is not damaged, but I figure it might be getting a bit sonically tired after about 40 years. If Gretsch made one to fit mine, I'd buy it, because my Gretch acoustic sounded close to my Acoustic wood National (that I wish I kept). The Repogle sure is priced right!

Jul 24, 2021 - 10:28:48 PM
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3663 posts since 7/27/2008

Of course the OMI cone is getting "tired" - this is pretty much a given.

In the grand scheme of things, a Replogle is $61 before shipping - and a Legend is $80 - not chump change regarding the difference - but not having to trim the cone and possibly modify the bridge insert - priceless! I 

Jul 25, 2021 - 1:10:44 AM
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121 posts since 11/9/2018

quote:
Originally posted by Old Blue

Repogle cone, or the more expensive Beard legend for my1972 (so, OMI?) Model 60 Dobro? MIne is not damaged, but I figure it might be getting a bit sonically tired after about 40 years. If Gretsch made one to fit mine, I'd buy it, because my Gretch acoustic sounded close to my Acoustic wood National (that I wish I kept). The Repogle sure is priced right!


I "refreshed" my '76 with this cheaper import Continental cone a few years back and it was a dramatic improvement.   I suspect they are used by Gretsch.   You don't realize how tired the old ones are until you replace them:

 

https://www.elderly.com/collections/category_resonator-instrument-parts-accessories?page=3

Jul 25, 2021 - 1:28:58 AM
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121 posts since 11/9/2018

I neglected to mention the Continental cone sat lower in the soundwell and required taller bridge inserts.

Jul 25, 2021 - 6:28:38 AM
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229 posts since 7/9/2010

Hello,

My gifted 1975 OMI uses the Beard. I routed and trued up the ledge because the stamped cone was glued in. I used my Dremel tool with the router base to follow to sound well. It plays well.

I tried cutting a Quaterman as finding 10.5” cones was difficult at that time. This led me to believe I had no other options. So, I routed to the dimensions of current cones.

Edited by - AradoReso on 07/25/2021 06:29:07

Jul 25, 2021 - 2:24:26 PM
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1126 posts since 9/29/2009

If you are confident you want the Beard cone, you can slowly reduce the diameter a little more safely with sandpaper or files. Be sure to work along the perimeter rather than perpendicular to it to avoid distorting the edge of the cone. Typically the cut in the outer edge is pretty uneven, so take down the wider areas first, and check the fit in the guitar often.

Jul 28, 2021 - 8:36 PM

Dobro60

USA

85 posts since 3/30/2014

Is the repogle or the quarter man cones as good as the beard legend? All new to this. Thanks

Jul 29, 2021 - 11:01:06 AM
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1012 posts since 1/10/2009

This is how Tim Scheerhorn trims a cone to fit. I suspect that the Legend, Replogle and Quarterman each sound different. I am partial to the Scheerhorn cone.


Jul 30, 2021 - 2:22:08 PM
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1126 posts since 9/29/2009

Wow, a belt sander! Looks fast, but very unforgiving, like it requires a fair amount of experience. If I were trying it, I'd want a bunch of cheap import cones, or maybe disposable aluminum pans from the grocery store to practice on before trying it on an $80 cone.

Jul 31, 2021 - 5:19:35 AM
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LukeL

USA

216 posts since 5/11/2018

quote:
Originally posted by AK Slider

This is how Tim Scheerhorn trims a cone to fit. I suspect that the Legend, Replogle and Quarterman each sound different. I am partial to the Scheerhorn cone.


I keep thinking of the cuts that thing could give you if it decided to rotate with the sander and the sharp edge slides through your fingers. Ouch.

Jul 31, 2021 - 5:49:09 AM
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badger

USA

548 posts since 8/10/2008

Gosh, if only there was some kind of covering, maybe fabric or leather, that you could wear on your hands when doing hard or dangerous things to prevent injury.

Actually, aluminum is soft and the thin cone edge is not likely to grab against a high-speed sanding belt, especially being fed into the direction of feed (in this case, upwards against a belt being driven downwards).

I'd like to know how Tim cleans his aluminum-clogged abrasive belt, though.

Aug 1, 2021 - 4:38:05 PM
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Bigred

USA

25 posts since 7/16/2018

I like that technique and have a floor belt sander....thanks !

Aug 1, 2021 - 5:32:40 PM

Dobro60

USA

85 posts since 3/30/2014

I think I'm going to order the 10 1/2 quarterman cone to keep from trimming or routing something. Iv just heard the legend was the absolute best in volume.

Aug 3, 2021 - 12:55 PM
Players Union Member

daver

USA

696 posts since 9/2/2008

quote:
Originally posted by badger

Gosh, if only there was some kind of covering, maybe fabric or leather, that you could wear on your hands when doing hard or dangerous things to prevent injury...

Hey, maybe we could come up with a name for those.  Something that rhymes with shove....

Though it seems counter intuitive, most (not all) woodworking tasks ought to be performed glove free.  Gloves prevent feeling the workpiece, provide a false sense of security, and are no match for power tool blades.

This is metalworking though.  And a belt sander.  Gloves would probably be a decent first line of defense here.

(Personal experience:  I have used the scissors technique, carefully cleaning up the edge with popsicle sticks.  I've also done the top routing, and have a fixture to assist.  Both worked well.)

Aug 3, 2021 - 1:09:38 PM

badger

USA

548 posts since 8/10/2008

As a friend of mine (who had lost several fingers in a horrific brush-chipper accident) explained it: if you cut yourself, it'll heal, but if you're wearing gloves, the cut glove will be ruined and you'll have to throw it away. 40+ years in cabinetmaking and I never could get comfortable wearing gloves. Too many stories about gloved (especially the cut-proof Kevlar) hands getting pulled into spinning blades.

That said, I would have gloved up for that particular operation. My hands are precious. Gloves are cheap.

Aug 3, 2021 - 1:59:19 PM
Players Union Member

daver

USA

696 posts since 9/2/2008

Just to be clear, I will use the thin rubber coated gloves when doing carpentry and remodeling stuff, mostly for grip and splinter protection. I don't use gloves at the table saw, and try to remain vigilant.

Here's something from a safety glove manufacturer: With rotating equipment, the best safety glove is no glove:

https://www.superiorglove.com/blog/no-gloves-around-rotating-equipment

Aug 3, 2021 - 5:14:08 PM

3663 posts since 7/27/2008

To bring it back around to the original subject, and keeping in mind the caveats of working with sharp tools and edges, along with potentially dangerous power tools - I like the Beard Legend cone - but not enough to go through all these flaming hoops to cut it down to 10 1/2 inches to make it fit an OMI Dobro. There is also the thing I mentioned earlier about how the Legend sits higher under the palmrest, because the way the spider "feet" rest on the outer edge  is raised slightly higher than the other cones being discussed here - and it can make for a tight fit which could require sanding work on the bottom of the bridge inserts. 

I have used Quarterman, Scheerhorn, and Legend cones in my Clinesmith. They are all top quality with different features and benefits. The Quarterman definitely doesn't sustain as long if one suspends it from a string and you tap the side with something to make it ring. 

Rick hasn't been back here yet to let us know if he has attempted to order a Quarterman. Sam posted earlier the link to Blue Note Woodworks and the fact that they are out of stock. This has been the case for months. They are not available from Elderly either - on that site it reads "coming soon."

Rick - buddy - just order the 10 1/2" Replogle and be done with it! Unless something has changed very recently - we don't know when Quarterman cones will be available again. Mike Replogle has been at this for a long time and he was the general manager appointed by Gibson @ OMI Dobro in Huntington Beach from 1993-1997 (Gibson purchased Dobro in 1993). They shut the doors in 1997 and moved the Dobro operation to Nashville. These days Mike is the production manager at one of the most esteemed flattop builders in the business, Santa Cruz Guitars.

Below I will share a post in the archives from early this year regarding a phone conversation I had with the fellow at Blue Note Woodworks in Oregon. 

Edited by - MarkinSonoma on 08/03/2021 17:15:15

Aug 3, 2021 - 5:25:20 PM

3663 posts since 7/27/2008

Below is most of a post I wrote on February 22 - a member was wondering if Quarteman cones were now being produced in China - no, they aren't:

Rob (of Blue Note Woodworks in Oregon) goes way back with John Quarterman and worked at OMI Dobro in southern California in the '70s.

He gave me the scoop on John. The man is 79 but still doing his thing as a one man operation. Rob told me that at one time John had been training a guy who was doing quite well at the spinning skills, but had to quit because he was going through a divorce and for whatever reason had to leave California.

Rob said that he asked John "when are you going to give up the baby?" but John has no intention of hanging it up any time soon. Good for him! Maybe someday he'll die while working at the lathe. ;~)

This is significant: the only 10 9/16" Quartermans Rob has for sale right now are cosmetic blems. There is sort of a stain or discoloration on part of the cone but Rob said it does not effect the sound.

Due to the pandemic the supply chain for the aluminum alloy Quarterman uses had been interrupted. As has been the case in many industries. I called my local bike shop yesterday because I needed some inner tubes for our road bikes and they finally got some in. They were out of stock for months.

Rob also said there was a significant item with John's machinery which apparently requires re-tooling and repair and that threw a wrench into the works as well.

So no ETA when new non-blem Quartermans are available, but as long as John Quarterman is alive and kicking here in California, they aren't "being made in China."

As far as "what's the best cone?" I think it's one of those deals like when guys who own pickups get together and discuss who makes the best truck. Ford? Chevy? Dodge?

Rob is a personable guy and told me if anyone wants to call him with any questions go for it - but he might not always be available to pick up the phone so leave a message and he'll call you back.

Link to the thread from February:

https://www.resohangout.com/topic/54796
 

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