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Resonator Guitar Lovers Online


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Dec 9, 2021 - 10:46:45 AM
352 posts since 9/9/2016

Just aquired 10 minutes ago .

Deep V neck and nut riser as seen on 27 and 37 from the era . F Holes . Top and bottom binding . No S/N on headstock. No rattle or buzzing . Includes old , but not original hard case .


(Will post more pic later ,when I have techical help, this is quick and dirty in front of store on my way home .)

What Model is this likely to be ?


 

Edited by - Biggfoot44 on 12/09/2021 10:48:20

Dec 9, 2021 - 1:29:10 PM

352 posts since 9/9/2016

I didn't look closely at the store at the inscription and signature on the back .

Showing it to Mrs Biggfoot at home , I looked closely , and it was :

To Maggie & Jay
Slidingly

Cindy Cashdollar
11-13-19

Dec 9, 2021 - 2:00:37 PM

3970 posts since 7/27/2008

Cool signature! One of my favorite players and a very nice lady. Though maybe  it's just me - I don't like signatures on guitars, unless it's a cheap instrument and one brings it to festivals to get signed by an assortment of celebrities. 

At any rate, nice looking Dobro!

I would say Regal-built (Chicago), Model R 25, 1939-40. The poinsettia coverplates started showing up near the end prior to the U.S. involvement in WW2 when all production ceased. 

Edited by - MarkinSonoma on 12/09/2021 14:05:08

Dec 9, 2021 - 2:28:56 PM

3970 posts since 7/27/2008

Fun fact from Dobro history: the F-holes were used on the lower priced models. Been scratching my head over this one for years. 

I've never been much of a skilled woodworker, but it seems to me that constructing the F-holes along with the four small circles is a more laborious process than creating a pair of circles for screen rings. (Some of the mid to higher end Dobros also had the three small circles between the fretboard and coverplate).

I guess it must be a cost saving move  not having to include metal screen rings. 

Dec 9, 2021 - 2:57:09 PM

352 posts since 9/9/2016

Cool ! Thanks for the info .

At the store I considered the signature a detriment , but still pleased for the deal. Seeing who it's from , it's worth leaving there .

Dec 10, 2021 - 4:35:46 AM
likes this

208 posts since 1/7/2019

So Cindy Cashdollar gave a pre-war Dobro as a gift, signed it for the recipient, and within two years it was in a used guitar store?

Dec 10, 2021 - 4:41:12 AM

MC5C

Canada

283 posts since 4/22/2015

Regal made, and based on the headstock and the 12 fret neck I would say 1934 or earlier. Later than 1936/7 they went to solid, not slotted, headstocks, and around 1935 they went to a 14 fret neck joint on that model. Mine is very very similar but with the more common fan cover plate (yours could obviously be a replacement, I wouldn't put a lot in that), same classic tailpiece, and as a 1935 Model 25 it's got a 14 fret neck. My coverplate has the patent number and "Other Patents Pending" stamped on, which is period correct as well. Mine came with a nut riser also, plus a neck string/strap and a bar/picks/string paper wraps. Mine had been owned by a soldier who didn't come back from WWII, and rested in it's case from around 1945 to 2015, when I got it. Neck has the deep vee shape, but is bowed so I play slide or lap style on it. The original owner played it lap style based on neck wear patterns. You might not have seen this catalog page yet... facebook.com/photo?fbid=339913...022578349

Dec 10, 2021 - 6:07:04 AM

badger

USA

593 posts since 8/10/2008

F-holes were doubtless cut with a router and a jig, probably while they were routing the big cone/spider space, so they didn't take much skill or time.

Dec 10, 2021 - 7:09:41 AM

MC5C

Canada

283 posts since 4/22/2015

I just noticed that the F-holes on the OP's Dobro are smooth sided. The F-holes on my 1935 Model 25 are notched in the middle of the sides. That's an interesting change!


 

Dec 10, 2021 - 11:41:27 AM

3970 posts since 7/27/2008

quote:
Originally posted by badger

F-holes were doubtless cut with a router and a jig, probably while they were routing the big cone/spider space, so they didn't take much skill or time.


I figured if anyone would know the deal it would be a professional cabinet maker like badger. Router or jig of course makes sense - but the overall design is much more elaborate or "fancy" than a pair of circles which is why it always  struck me as odd that the f-holes were on the lower priced models. Maybe my theory regarding metal screen rings adding to the price has some merit.

Just one more example of the convoluted history if the Dobro guitar. 

Edited by - MarkinSonoma on 12/10/2021 11:43:48

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Dec 10, 2021 - 12:03:21 PM

LukeL

USA

283 posts since 5/11/2018

quote:
Originally posted by toddborger

So Cindy Cashdollar gave a pre-war Dobro as a gift, signed it for the recipient, and within two years it was in a used guitar store?


It's possible the last owener(s) only met her and had her sign it?

Dec 10, 2021 - 12:10:39 PM

3970 posts since 7/27/2008

quote:
Originally posted by MC5C

Regal made, and based on the headstock and the 12 fret neck I would say 1934 or earlier. Later than 1936/7 they went to solid, not slotted, headstocks, and around 1935 they went to a 14 fret neck joint on that model. Mine is very very similar but with the more common fan cover plate (yours could obviously be a replacement, I wouldn't put a lot in that)


Brian, you're making what strikes me as  an absolute declaration that at a certain point in the mid '30s they went to solid headstocks on all Dobros. 

That is not the case. A few examples of slotted headstocks in Steve Toth's book, Dobro Roots, and there are others. The Model 45 with the screen rings is circa 1939.

 You should buy the book. 
 


 




 

Dec 10, 2021 - 12:24:17 PM

352 posts since 9/9/2016

Today I'm working 0300 to 2300 , and have an event tommorow , but I will get some more pics when I can .

My assumption is that the then ( 2019) owner encountered Cindy C. at an event or workshop , where she signed it .

 

 

  Arrrrgh ! Finger slipped , and accidentally posted these two incorrect photos , and I'm too computer illiterate to remove them .




Edited by - Biggfoot44 on 12/10/2021 12:27:00

Dec 10, 2021 - 12:33:31 PM

3970 posts since 7/27/2008

Bigfoot - wrong guitar.

Yeah - the way she signed it comes off like the guitar might have been "presented" to the former owners by Cindy, but maybe she just puts out the extra effort instead of just scrawling her signature only like many celebrity musicians do. 

Though the  signing does seem kind've personal compared to what you normally come across with guitars. 


 

Edited by - MarkinSonoma on 12/10/2021 12:35:37

Dec 10, 2021 - 12:35:26 PM

208 posts since 1/7/2019

quote:
Originally posted by Biggfoot44


My assumption is that the then ( 2019) owner encountered Cindy C. at an event or workshop , where she signed it .

 


I thought about that as soon as I hit "Post". I meant it as semi-humorous, though, so I let it go.
But while someone giving away the gift is puzzling to me, someone getting a signature on a pre-war guitar and then turning around and selling it just seems wrong. But I don't know the circumstances. Perhaps there was a need.

Dec 10, 2021 - 12:42:39 PM

3970 posts since 7/27/2008

You might never know about the circumstances unless  you can speak to the prior owner. 

 I've looked at my early '30s Model 37 and wondered what stories it could tell. I've owned it for 45 years, so I have my own stories - but it was already about 42 years old when I acquired it. 

Brings to mind the legendary 1935  D-28 that Tony Rice played for decades that had previously been owned by Clarence White. Clarence and his brother Roland found it at a guitar shop in Los Angeles  in the mid '50s, already beat to crap, and with an enlarged sound hole and in need of a new fretboard. That guitar was only about  20 years old at the time and to paraphrase Mick Jagger, it had already taken its fair share of abuse. 
 

Edited by - MarkinSonoma on 12/10/2021 12:49:22

Dec 10, 2021 - 8:45:47 PM
like this

352 posts since 9/9/2016

In my other field of hobby , the usual reason for vintage items appearing on the market is being liquidated by previous owner's heirs .

Dec 11, 2021 - 3:40:34 PM

3970 posts since 7/27/2008

quote:
Originally posted by Biggfoot44

In my other field of hobby , the usual reason for vintage items appearing on the market is being liquidated by previous owner's heirs .


Okay, sounds interesting - what is this other field of hobby?

Dec 13, 2021 - 8:25:14 AM

352 posts since 9/9/2016

Things that go bang .

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